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New Years Resolutions. We make them. We break them. We rinse and repeat. In fact, this process happens so consistently, it’s almost a running joke for many.


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Photo by Les Anderson on Unsplash

Stress comes in all shapes and sizes, but for many of us, the holidays are a time of year when stress is at an all-time high. We know that chronic stress can be damaging to our body and mind, but even these temporary spikes can lead to short-term side effects. This can make coping with stress even more difficult, which then leads to more stress. The good news is that there are a ton of ways we can alleviate stress. Here are five of our favorite techniques, with a holiday twist.

  1. Deck the halls


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Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

What if all we had tomorrow were the things we were grateful for today?

It’s a powerful question that reminds us how to embrace an attitude of gratitude. Today is traditionally marked by expressing the things we are thankful for. This year has been difficult on all of us in different ways. And while that can make it harder for us to express our appreciation or give thanks, it’s also when it’s the most important.

Gratitude changes us. It isn’t just a feel good moment, though it does make us feel good. But expressing gratitude frequently alters the chemistry in our brain, elevating the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine the entire day. …


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Over the last year, we’ve all adapted towards a remote way of life. Where before, in-person meetings, classrooms, and workplaces were the norm, now, we log onto zoom calls for virtual sessions instead. And while we’ve become accustomed to logging in as part of our new commute, new challenges are being faced for students, teachers, workers, and parents.

Some individuals are going to take to online classes or meetings more naturally than others. So how can we adjust the way information is being presented to help those that may struggle more? …


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Photo by Lukas Blazek on Unsplash

Twice a year, many of us around the world experience a time jolt, jumping an hour ahead in the spring and moving an hour backwards in the fall. Known as daylight time in the US and Canada, or summer time in the UK and other countries around the world, this process began officially in Ontario in 1908 building to greater adoption by Europe in 1916, and finally the US is 1918.

Time change has had mixed opinions since it was first introduced, but the fact is, in our industrialized global world, we experience time changes every time we travel across time zones. And while daylight or summer time is proposed to help us capture the benefits of longer daylight hours, with a twenty-four hour economy, those of us required to work alternating shifts may experience these abrupt changes on a far more frequent basis. …


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Once we’ve learned what the flow cycle is, and we’ve practiced finding our flow, we now have to master keeping our flow. But this is easier said than done.

No matter how much we practice or how fluid we get at reaching the flow cycle, there will be always be obstacles we need to be aware of. Being able to identify what will keep us out of flow will help us navigate our routines so we can prepare and plan our flow cycle sessions.

Ideally we want to be able to find our flow as often as possible. If we have approaching deadlines or work that requires it, that may mean attempting to get into the flow several times per day. So anything keeping us from reaching that state is effectively our productivity nemesis. …


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Photo by Kat Stokes on Unsplash

In our last article, we talked about the four stages of flow. This highly productive state is closely tied with motivation. The more we achieve flow state, the more motivated we become to fall into flow regularly.

If we’re new to finding the flow state, this attempt to unlock the flow cycle on a regular basis can be an avenue of frustration. Sometimes we aren’t sure how we reached flow state the first time. Or maybe we’re so determined to get there, we end up not resting enough, leading to burn out.

But practice is essential in ensuring we’re able to get into flow state as often as possible, particularly when we are motivated and working to reach a productive goal. In order to set ourselves up for success, here are five things to keep in mind as we go into every flow cycle. …


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Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

When it comes to productivity, there’s an almost mythical state many of us spend our professional lives searching for. It’s known by many names. Finding our groove. Getting in the zone. Unlocking our focus factor. But all of that describes one state: flow.

The flow state is an ideal state of consciousness, where we feel great and perform our best. When we are in flow, we are full of an energized focus. More than being wholly involved in our project, we also are thoroughly enjoying ourselves. It is engagement so complete, even our sense of time is transformed.

While being in the flow may be attributed to business and daily productivity, research shows we benefit from being in the flow state in many areas such as creative arts, athletics, teaching, and more. Since the flow state is an important part of skill acquisition and learning, it is a valuable process that can help us push through obstacles and unlock our unlimited learning potential. …


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Intelligence is broadly defined as the ability to acquire and then apply knowledge and skills. Because of this, we tend to think of intelligence as a single trait, or a single ability. General intelligence being narrowed further to two letters: IQ.

But in order to describe a trait that encompasses more than a single cognitive function, such as intelligence, we need to broaden the way we understand and define what intelligence is.

In 1983, Dr. Howard Gardner set out to do just that. He developed and wrote Theory of Multiple Intelligences, where he broke intelligence into eight distinct types.

While Gardner doesn’t define intelligence differently, he allows for intelligence to be defined through a wide range of cognitive abilities. He argued that how individuals learn shapes their intelligence. Where previous intelligence testing and education focused largely on linguistic and logical, Gardner argued that forcing one type of learning on all students’ limited success on a broad spectrum. …


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Photo by JOSHUA COLEMAN on Unsplash

The concept of the six thinking hats was devised by Edward de Bono in 1985. It’s a problem-solving strategy that uses parallel thinking, which is a thinking process similar that splits the focus into different parallel tracks. This strategy is commonly used in debates, where we take one topic at a time and focus a specific set of questions in order to reach specific answers.

Using this thinking process may sound complicated. But really, it’s a way of problem-solving that increases not just productivity but the ability to make clear and focused decisions. By simply dividing the decision-making process into six precise focal points, we can analyze any problem thoroughly and efficiently. …

About

Jim Kwik

Jim Kwik is the brain trainer to top performers, executives, & celebrities. KwikBrain is designed to help busy people learn anything in a fraction of the time.

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